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Worlds Lightest 13″ Laptop – Toshiba R700

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Here it is. On my desk. Toshiba’s Flagship model, the 1.2kg, 13.3 inch, Core i5 R700 laptop.

Visually, there is not much to say other than its black. Black top, black bottom, black everywhere. There is also no textures or cool engraved graphics anywhere. For those looking to make a fashion statement, look elsewhere.

The Toshiba R700 is squarely aimed at the mobile professional. It’s ultra light while sporting a powerful Core i5 processor, no ultra low voltage processors here. This laptop can be specified with a range of upgrades including a  full i7 Core and SSD storage.

This light and thin notebook also comes with a built in DVD drive while only having a 13.3″ chassis. Toshiba have used innovative air cooled technology to channel airflow through the laptop ensuring it doesn’t overheat when loading up the CPU.

The case is made from a magnesium alloy. How cool does that sound. Magnesium Alloy. The magnesium alloy is crafted into a unique honeycomb rib structure to provide rigidity.

As with most business oriented laptops the R700 features a matt screen making it easy to read under all lighting conditions. The speakers are better than I was expecting from a ‘thin and light’ and I had no problem listening to a news broadcast here in my office.

Toshiba claim a 8.5 hour battery life however with real life use don’t expect this. They must have performed their benchmark with the computer at the login screen. The keyboard is a chicklet style and sports a large touch pad with nice polished metal left/right buttons.

Using this laptop I have not found anything I did not like. Toshiba is a trusted laptop manufacturer and they have put a lot of thought into this model, backing it up with a 3 Year warranty.

Pricing starts from around $1950 for an i5 version with 320Gb hard drive. Expect to pay around $3.5k for a i7 SSD version.

Toshiba’s Specification List can be viewed here.

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